Live with Passion & Purpose!

jumping for joyLive with Passion & Purpose Discovery Session

This Free 45 min. session by phone will cover past, present and future goals/dreams for your business and your life.

Scheduling Appointments Now
Send me an email to marcia@midlifetransitioncoaching.com

• Create a sense of Clarity about the business you really want to have
• Discover the essential Building Blocks for having the lifestyle of dreams
• Determine the #1 thing stopping you from having business/life you want
• Identify the most powerful actions that will move toward the business/life you desire
• Complete the Discovery Session with the excitement of knowing EXACTLY what to do next to create the entrepreneur you want to be


Comments

Live with Passion & Purpose! — 27 Comments

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  2. Nigeria plunged into a civil war from 1967 to 1970, and became a federation that was formally independent
    in 1960. It’s since switched between democratically-elected civilian governments
    and military dictatorships, until it attained a stable democracy in 1999,
    with its 2011 presidential elections being viewed as the first to be conducted moderately
    freely and fairly.

  3. The result of the 1961 plebiscite created in the polity an imbalance.
    While Northern Cameroons chose to stay in Nigeria Southern Cameroon elected to join the Republic of Cameroon,.

    The northern area of the nation was now far bigger compared to the southern area.

    The nation created a Federal Republic, as its first president with Azikiwe.

  4. Nigeria gained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960.
    Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor General in 1960.

    The opposition included the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG), that has been mainly dominated by the
    Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo.

  5. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively contain and remove
    the Ebola danger that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as its
    exceptional way of contact tracing became an effective technique later used by other countries, including the
    United States, when Ebola hazards were found.

  6. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively control and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging
    three other countries in the West African area, as its unique method of contact tracing became an effective approach later
    used by other countries, such as the United States Of America, when Ebola risks were discovered.

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  9. During the oil boom of the 1970s, Nigeria joined
    OPEC and the huge revenue created made the economy richer.
    Despite huge earnings from oil production and sale, the military administration did
    little to enhance the standard of living of the population, help medium and small businesses, or
    purchase infrastructure. As oil revenues fuelled the rise of national subventions to states, the government became the center of political battle
    and the threshold of power in the nation. As oil production and revenue climbed, the
    Nigerian authorities became increasingly determined by
    petroleum sales and the international commodity
    markets for budgetary and economical concerns. It did not
    develop other sources of the economy for economic stability.
    That spelled doom to federalism in Nigeria.

  10. Nigeria attained independence from the UK as a Commonwealth Realm on 1 October 1960.
    Azikiwe became Nigeria’s maiden Governor-General in 1960.
    The opposition consisted of the comparatively liberal Action Group (AG),
    that has been largely dominated by the Yoruba and led by Obafemi Awolowo.

    The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups – the Hausa (‘Northerners’),
    Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) – were sharp.

  11. Nigeria has one of the greatest populations of youth in the world.
    The country is viewed as a multinational state, as it’s
    inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three biggest
    are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages, and are
    identified with extensive variety of cultures. The official language is English.Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mainly in the
    southern part of the state, and Muslims in the northern part.
    A minority of the people practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, including those
    native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  12. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians,
    who live largely in Muslims in the northern area,
    and the southern part of the country. A minority of the inhabitants
    practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to
    Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  13. Organized as a loose federation of self governing states, the independent nation confronted the overwhelming
    job of unifying a country with 250 ethnic and linguistic groups.

  14. The modern state originated from the merging of
    the Southern Nigeria Protectorate, and British colonial rule
    beginning in the 19th century and Northern Nigeria
    Protectorate in 1914. The British set up legal and administrative structures whilst practising indirect rule through conventional
    chiefdoms.

  15. Nigeria is frequently called the “Giant of Africa”, owing to its large population and market.
    With about 182 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa and the seventh most
    populous nation on the planet.

  16. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first state to effectively check
    and eliminate the Ebola hazard that was ravaging three other nations
    in the West African area, as its exceptional approach to contact tracing became an effective
    method after used by other nations, like the Usa, when Ebola risks were found.

  17. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the
    southern area of the country, and Muslims in the northern part.
    A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to
    Nigeria, such as for example those native to Igbo and Yoruba peoples.

  18. In the 2014 ebola outbreak, Nigeria was the first nation to effectively check and eliminate the Ebola threat that was ravaging three other countries in the West African region, as
    its unique method of contact tracing became an effective approach afterwards used by other countries, like the United
    States, when Ebola hazards were discovered.

  19. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world’s 20th largest
    economy, worth $1 trillion and more than $500 billion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity.

    It overtook South Africa to become Africa’s biggest market in 2014.Additionally, the debt-to-GDP ratio is just 11 percent, which is 8 percent below the 2012 ratio.

  20. Its coast in the south lies in the Atlantic Ocean on the Gulf of Guinea.
    It contains the Federal Capital Territory and 36
    states, where the capital, Abuja is located. Nigeria is formally a democratic laic state.

  21. Since 2002, sectarian violence has been seen by the North East of the nation by Boko Haram, an Islamist
    movement that seeks to abolish the lay process of government
    and establish Sharia law. Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014 asserted that
    Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,
    000 individuals crippled. Neighbouring nations, at the same
    time, Benin, Chad, Cameroon and Niger joined Nigeria in a combined effort to
    battle Boko Haram in the wake of a world media emphasized the spread of Boko Haram
    assaults and kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls to
    these nations.

  22. The North East of the state has found sectarian violence
    by Boko Haram, an Islamist movement that seeks to abolish the secular process of government and establish Sharia law.
    Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in May 2014
    asserted that Boko Haram strikes have left at least 12,000 people dead and 8,000 people
    crippled. Neighbouring states, at the exact same time, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin joined Nigeria in a combined
    effort to fight Boko Haram in the consequences of a
    world media highlighted kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls and the spread of Boko Haram strikes to these nations.

  23. Nigeria attained independence from Great Britain as a
    Commonwealth Realm on 1. Nigeria’s government was a coalition of conservative parties: the
    Nigerian People’s Congress (NPC), a party controlled by Northerners and those of the Islamic religion, and the Igbo and Christian-dominated National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons (NCNC)
    directed by Nnamdi Azikiwe. Azikiwe became Nigeria’s
    maiden Governor-General in 1960. The opposition included the relatively liberal Action Group
    (AG), that has been mostly dominated by the Yoruba and directed by Obafemi Awolowo.
    The cultural and political differences between Nigeria’s dominant ethnic groups
    – the Hausa (‘Northerners’), Igbo (‘Easterners’) and Yoruba (‘Westerners’) –
    were sharp.

  24. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live largely in Muslims in the
    northern area, and the southern area of the nation. A minority of the inhabitants practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, for example those native to
    Yoruba and Igbo peoples.

  25. As of 2015, Nigeria is the 20th largest economy,
    worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in relation to nominal
    GDP and purchasing power parity respectively of the world.

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